Elephant’s Leg


AMAZING THAILAND – THE SLOGAN AND THE REALITY
Nick and I on an "amazing" Koh Chang elephant

Nick and I on an “amazing” Koh Chang elephant

“Amazing Thailand” is the long-running official slogan of the international tourism drive, as well as the ironic quote of choice for the cynical expat when hearing of some latest outrage.

The latest poltical protest? “Amazing Thailand”. Video footage of a bungling and/or corrupt cop? “Amazing Thailand”. Idiotic driving? “Amazing Thailand”. And so on.

Expats are often pretty miserable types. Naturally, when you live somewhere, you see a lot more of the contry’s foibles and annoyances than the average two-week tourist. But that doesn’t mean the tourist experience is invalid or inaccurate. To the temporary visitor, many things about this country really are amazing. Those of us who live here shouldn’t forget that.

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LEAVING THE ELEPHANT: AN ODE TO A HOME

People were incredulous when I told them I lived in an elephant’s leg, but I was neither lying nor quoting from a Dr Seuss book. No, for more than seven years I lived in a building called the Elephant Tower, so named because of its unmistakeable shape. See for yourself:

The Elephant Tower at Ratchayothin

The Elephant Tower at Ratchayothin

I lived in the back legs of that building, about halfway up. Thus, I named my blog Elephant’s Leg because that had been my perspective point for most of the time I have lived in Thailand. Seven years and three months, in fact. My childhood home aside, it was the longest consecutive time I had stayed in one place.

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CATCHING UP: TRAVEL
Ko Chang

Ko Chang

The first item on the agenda is to fill in the gaps between September 2008 and September 2009, before I will start writing about more timely stuff, as and when it happens. I will be concise, because 12 months is a long time to chronicle, and will perhaps return to certain points in more detail at a later date.

TRAVEL

Everyone who knows me will know how much I love to travel. The prospect of living and working abroad always excited me, and now I am doing it. I expected that living in Thailand would enable me to jet off to nearby Asian countries frequently, not to mention that Thailand itself is chock-full of attractive destinations.

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CATCHING UP: PERSONAL LIFE

Waew and I

The first item on the agenda is to fill in the gaps between September 2008 and September 2009, before I will start writing about more timely stuff, as and when it happens. I will be concise, because 12 months is a long time to chronicle, and will perhaps return to certain points in more detail at a later date.

I moved to Bangkok in April 2008 with my then-fiancee, Maki. Both of us had work lined up and we used the month or so before starting employment to find a place to live, get a feel for Bangkok and take a couple of trips around Thailand.

Once we settled into working life here, things started to go wrong. Continue reading



THE ELEPHANT’S LEG MAKES ITS FIRST STEPS BACK
September 17, 2009, 4:40 am
Filed under: Miscellaneous | Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Back to the grind

Back to the grind

Welcome back – or welcome for the first time – to The Elephant’s Leg. Whether you are making an occasional check to see if it has been resurrected, whether you have been directed back here by myself, or whether you found this blog through some other means.

As this is the first post in about a year, here’s a quick recap:

WHAT IS THE ELEPHANT’S LEG?

This is a blog by a British expat living in Bangkok. So far, so unremarkable. But I’m not trying to pretend it’s anything more than that. I’m not a political analyst. I’m not a comedian or a satirist. I’m not an industry insider, or a mover and shaker. I’m not promoting anything. This is simply an outlet for my experiences and thoughts during a fascinating chapter in my life. The primary target is the family and friends who already know me, although of course anybody is welcome here. The primary reason is to keep them up to date with my life in the Land of Smiles, and secondly to keep a record of events and impressions that I myself may review in the future. Beyond that remit, if anybody else is entertained, then that’s a happy bonus.

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